"MAYDAY vs PAN PAN" Why do pilots use these CALLS? Explained by CAPTAIN JOE

To day, I’ll show you video "MAYDAY vs PAN PAN" Why do pilots use these CALLS? Explained by CAPTAIN JOE

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Dear friends and followers welcome back to my channel and to a great video about the famous MAYDAY and PAN PAN call.
We´ll be looking at why and when pilots use these calls.

First off the definition of MAYDAY:

Mayday is an emergency procedure word used internationally as a distress signal in voice-procedure radio communications.

It is used to signal a life-threatening emergency primarily by aviators and mariners, but in some countries local organizations such as firefighters, police forces, and transportation organizations also use the term. The call is always given three times in a row (“Mayday mayday mayday”) to prevent its being mistaken for some similar-sounding phrase under noisy conditions, and to distinguish an actual mayday call from a message about a mayday call.

The “mayday” procedure word was originated in 1923, by a senior radio officer at Croydon Airport in London. The officer, Frederick Stanley Mockford, was asked to think of a word that would indicate distress and would easily be understood by all pilots and ground staff in an emergency. Since much of the traffic at the time was between Croydon and Le Bourget Airport in Paris, he proposed the expression “mayday” from the French m’aider (‘help me’), a shortened form of venez m’aider (‘come and help me’).It is unrelated to the holiday May Day.

Before the voice call “mayday”, SOS was the Morse code equivalent of the mayday call. In 1927, the International Radiotelegraph Convention of Washington adopted the voice call mayday as the radiotelephone distress call in place of the SOS radiotelegraph (Morse code) call.

PAN PAN call definition:
The radiotelephony message PAN-PAN is the international standard urgency signal that someone aboard a boat, ship, aircraft, or other vehicle uses to declare that they have a situation that is urgent, but for the time being, does not pose an immediate danger to anyone’s life or to the vessel itself. This is referred to as a state of urgency. This is distinct from a mayday call (distress signal), which means that there is an imminent danger to life or to the continued viability of the vessel itself Radioing pan-pan informs potential rescuers (including emergency services and other craft in the area) that an urgent problem exists, whereas mayday calls on them to drop all other activities and immediately begin a rescue.

The exact representation of PAN-PAN in Morse code is the urgency signal XXX, which was first defined by the International Radiotelegraph Convention of 1927.

But see more in the video on how they are being used accordingly!

Thank you very much for your time! I hope you enjoy this video!
Wishing you all the best!

Your “Captain” Joe

Big thank you to all other youtubers who provided me with the video material to create this video. Your content is highly appreciated. Please follow their channels:
@VASaviation
@San Francisco International airport
@headintheclouds46
@RT
@H89SA (FAMOUS FOR KENNEDY STEVE RECORDINGS 😉 )
@Daniel Mori

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"MAYDAY vs PAN PAN" Why do pilots use these CALLS? Explained by CAPTAIN JOE uploaded in 2020-12-27 21:38:39 by Captain Joe